Book an
Appointment
Starting 5/11/2020
we are open!

Our Blog

Gum Disease and Your Child

September 28th, 2022

At Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates, we know that unfortunately, gum disease can exist in your child’s mouth without you even knowing. In fact, your child may be suffering from the beginning stages of periodontal (gum) disease without noticing any pain or discomfort. Since gum disease can be undetectable, it’s critical to watch for the warning signs in order to prevent the disease from growing worse!

If your child is experiencing any of the following symptoms, you may want to consider scheduling an appointment with Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat as soon as possible:

  • Gums that are red or swollen
  • Gums that feel tender
  • Gums that bleed easily during brushing or flossing
  • Gums that are receding
  • Persistent halitosis (bad breath)
  • Loose teeth
  • Any change in the way teeth come together in the biting position

If your child is experiencing these symptoms, schedule an appointment right away by calling our Frederick office. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team can diagnose the problem and begin treatment to save your child’s teeth!

Our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates looks forward to seeing you!

Kids and Teeth Grinding

September 21st, 2022

Grind, grind, grind… if your little one happens to be a teeth grinder, you may be familiar with this unpleasant sound. Teeth grinding, or what Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates also call bruxism, is common in children. In fact, three out of ten kids grind or clench their teeth, usually in response to stress, jaw growth, malocclusion, losing teeth, or other discomforts, such as allergies. Kids typically outgrow teeth grinding by the time they reach their teenage years.

Many kids who grind their teeth in their sleep have no idea they’re doing it. In fact, when they wake up in the morning they feel no jaw, facial, neck, or shoulder pain. In most cases, if it hadn’t been for a parent or sibling telling them about it, the teeth grinding would have gone unnoticed.

There are children, however, who wake up with jaw pain, shoulder pain, neck pain, and headaches. Teeth grinding can cause a host of dental complications, from cracked teeth and receding gums to a misaligned jaw. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat will tell you that teeth grinding is not something to take lightly. Teeth grinding can have serious consequences that, if left untreated, can lead to tooth fractures and damage to the temporomandibular joint, also known as TMJ.

The first step in helping your child recover from teeth grinding is noticing and diagnosing the problem. Symptoms of teeth grinding typically include:

  • Grinding noises when your child is sleeping
  • Complaints of tightness or pain in the jaw
  • Complaints of headaches, earaches, or facial pain
  • Complaints of pain when chewing
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Chipped, worn down, or loose teeth

If you suspect your child is a teeth grinder, Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team will be able to help. Please give us a call at our convenient Frederick office! We look forward to treating your child!

Dangers of Thumb Sucking

September 14th, 2022

It’s common for children to suck their thumb at a young age. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team want you to understand the potential issues that can surface down the road if the habit isn’t broken early on.

It’s normal for infants to explore the function of their mouths by putting objects like their thumbs inside it. You shouldn’t be concerned if your baby regularly sucks his or her thumb. For infants who are still growing their baby teeth, thumb sucking can help with stimulating growth and development of their baby teeth.

Thumb sucking is not a problem among infants because they generally do it to sooth and comfort themselves. Problems can occur of kids continue the habit when their baby teeth begin to fall out, around six years of age.

If you have a young child whose adult teeth are starting to come in, that’s when thumb sucking can start to be a problem. Most children stop thumb sucking between the ages of two and three years. According to the American Dental Association, if thumb sucking continues as adult teeth come in, this can lead to problems involving improper alignment of teeth and growth of the jaw, gums, and roof of the mouth.

It may also affect your child’s speech after that, by causing a lisp or other speech impediments. As a parent, you may need to begin to regulate and intervene if thumb sucking starts to become a bigger problem for your child.

How to Stop Thumb Sucking

  • Provide comfort to your child if thumb sucking happens when he or she is anxious.
  • Limit thumb sucking initially to bedtime or naptime.
  • Employ positive reinforcement for good behavior.
  • Talk with your child about the potential problems that come from this habit.
  • Distract your son or daughter with activities such as fun games any time you notice it starting.
  • Involve your little one in choosing methods for stopping, like positive rewards.
  • Have Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat talk to your child to reinforce concerns about thumb sucking.

Don’t forget that thumb sucking is a common habit that many children indulge in, and it should not be a concern right away. If you’re worried about your child’s thumb-sucking habit, start to address the issue as soon as possible.

The above techniques can help to reduce the amount of time your child sucks a thumb. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team are here to help you if you have any questions or concerns about this habit.

Feel free to call our Frederick office and we will be happy to help you and your child.

September is National Childhood Injury Prevention Month!

September 7th, 2022

September is National Childhood Injury Prevention Month, and Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates are excited to share some tips to keep your child safe. Childhood is a time when dental injuries are common. Even a simple fall on the playground at recess can lead to a lost or broken tooth. What can you do as a parent to protect your child’s teeth in addition to his or her head and bones? These tips will help you prevent mouth and dental injuries to your kids.

First, use common sense when your children play sports. An estimated 13 to 39 percent of oral-facial injuries occur when children are playing sports. Make sure your child wears a face guard, mouthguard, and helmet as appropriate. Contact sports, such as football, require this gear, so insist that it gets worn.

Next, teach your children not to walk or run with things in their mouths. This is particularly difficult for toddlers and preschoolers, who love to explore the world orally. Insist that items are removed from the mouth whenever the child is in motion, and try to redirect the child to softer items for oral stimulation.

For small children, be careful when you put a spoon or fork in the mouth. While this won’t damage teeth, it can damage the delicate skin between the lips and gums or under the tongue. Allow your child to direct his or her own feeding; never shove a spoon in your child’s mouth if he or she is not interested, to avoid this type of injury.

Finally, make sure your children are seen regularly by Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat. Regular dental checkups will keep the teeth clean, strong, and healthy, and limit the risk of injuries.

If your child is injured in spite of your best efforts, contact our Frederick office right away. Quick action may be able to save a missing tooth, and a quick response on your part will limit the long-term effects of the injury.