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Kids and Teeth Grinding

September 21st, 2022

Grind, grind, grind… if your little one happens to be a teeth grinder, you may be familiar with this unpleasant sound. Teeth grinding, or what Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates also call bruxism, is common in children. In fact, three out of ten kids grind or clench their teeth, usually in response to stress, jaw growth, malocclusion, losing teeth, or other discomforts, such as allergies. Kids typically outgrow teeth grinding by the time they reach their teenage years.

Many kids who grind their teeth in their sleep have no idea they’re doing it. In fact, when they wake up in the morning they feel no jaw, facial, neck, or shoulder pain. In most cases, if it hadn’t been for a parent or sibling telling them about it, the teeth grinding would have gone unnoticed.

There are children, however, who wake up with jaw pain, shoulder pain, neck pain, and headaches. Teeth grinding can cause a host of dental complications, from cracked teeth and receding gums to a misaligned jaw. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat will tell you that teeth grinding is not something to take lightly. Teeth grinding can have serious consequences that, if left untreated, can lead to tooth fractures and damage to the temporomandibular joint, also known as TMJ.

The first step in helping your child recover from teeth grinding is noticing and diagnosing the problem. Symptoms of teeth grinding typically include:

  • Grinding noises when your child is sleeping
  • Complaints of tightness or pain in the jaw
  • Complaints of headaches, earaches, or facial pain
  • Complaints of pain when chewing
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Chipped, worn down, or loose teeth

If you suspect your child is a teeth grinder, Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team will be able to help. Please give us a call at our convenient Frederick office! We look forward to treating your child!

Dangers of Thumb Sucking

September 14th, 2022

It’s common for children to suck their thumb at a young age. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team want you to understand the potential issues that can surface down the road if the habit isn’t broken early on.

It’s normal for infants to explore the function of their mouths by putting objects like their thumbs inside it. You shouldn’t be concerned if your baby regularly sucks his or her thumb. For infants who are still growing their baby teeth, thumb sucking can help with stimulating growth and development of their baby teeth.

Thumb sucking is not a problem among infants because they generally do it to sooth and comfort themselves. Problems can occur of kids continue the habit when their baby teeth begin to fall out, around six years of age.

If you have a young child whose adult teeth are starting to come in, that’s when thumb sucking can start to be a problem. Most children stop thumb sucking between the ages of two and three years. According to the American Dental Association, if thumb sucking continues as adult teeth come in, this can lead to problems involving improper alignment of teeth and growth of the jaw, gums, and roof of the mouth.

It may also affect your child’s speech after that, by causing a lisp or other speech impediments. As a parent, you may need to begin to regulate and intervene if thumb sucking starts to become a bigger problem for your child.

How to Stop Thumb Sucking

  • Provide comfort to your child if thumb sucking happens when he or she is anxious.
  • Limit thumb sucking initially to bedtime or naptime.
  • Employ positive reinforcement for good behavior.
  • Talk with your child about the potential problems that come from this habit.
  • Distract your son or daughter with activities such as fun games any time you notice it starting.
  • Involve your little one in choosing methods for stopping, like positive rewards.
  • Have Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat talk to your child to reinforce concerns about thumb sucking.

Don’t forget that thumb sucking is a common habit that many children indulge in, and it should not be a concern right away. If you’re worried about your child’s thumb-sucking habit, start to address the issue as soon as possible.

The above techniques can help to reduce the amount of time your child sucks a thumb. Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team are here to help you if you have any questions or concerns about this habit.

Feel free to call our Frederick office and we will be happy to help you and your child.

September is National Childhood Injury Prevention Month!

September 7th, 2022

September is National Childhood Injury Prevention Month, and Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates are excited to share some tips to keep your child safe. Childhood is a time when dental injuries are common. Even a simple fall on the playground at recess can lead to a lost or broken tooth. What can you do as a parent to protect your child’s teeth in addition to his or her head and bones? These tips will help you prevent mouth and dental injuries to your kids.

First, use common sense when your children play sports. An estimated 13 to 39 percent of oral-facial injuries occur when children are playing sports. Make sure your child wears a face guard, mouthguard, and helmet as appropriate. Contact sports, such as football, require this gear, so insist that it gets worn.

Next, teach your children not to walk or run with things in their mouths. This is particularly difficult for toddlers and preschoolers, who love to explore the world orally. Insist that items are removed from the mouth whenever the child is in motion, and try to redirect the child to softer items for oral stimulation.

For small children, be careful when you put a spoon or fork in the mouth. While this won’t damage teeth, it can damage the delicate skin between the lips and gums or under the tongue. Allow your child to direct his or her own feeding; never shove a spoon in your child’s mouth if he or she is not interested, to avoid this type of injury.

Finally, make sure your children are seen regularly by Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat. Regular dental checkups will keep the teeth clean, strong, and healthy, and limit the risk of injuries.

If your child is injured in spite of your best efforts, contact our Frederick office right away. Quick action may be able to save a missing tooth, and a quick response on your part will limit the long-term effects of the injury.

Labor Day: Our favorite holiday to rest!

August 31st, 2022

Labor Day, celebrated on the first Monday each September here in the United States, is a holiday devoted to the American working community. The purpose of the holiday is honoring the country's workers and their contributions to the strength of our country as a whole.

How Labor Day Started

There is actually some debate as to the origins of Labor Day. It is uncertain whether Peter McGuire, a cofounder for the American Federation of Labor, or Matthew Maguire, who was the secretary of Central Labor Union of New York, had the great idea. However, the Central Labor Union's plans were what launched the first Labor Day in America.

The First Labor Day

The very first Labor Day was celebrated on September 5th, 1882. The Central Labor Union then held annual celebrations on September 5th for what they called a working man's holiday. By the year 1885, the Labor Day celebration had spread to many different industrial areas, and after that it began spreading to all industries in the United States.

Labor Day Today

Labor Day today is a huge United States holiday during which we honor the country's workers with a day of rest and relaxation or a day of picnics and parades. This holiday is truly one to honor the many people who work hard to contribute to the economic well-being of our great country!

Our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates hopes all of our patients celebrate Labor Day, and every holiday, safely and happily. Whether you stay in the Frederick area, or travel out of town, have fun, and don't forget to brush!

Who’s afraid of the dentist?

August 24th, 2022

Is the sound of a drill enough to make your child flinch or cringe? Does he or she worry about the twice-yearly dental checkup at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates? Trust us when we say your child is not alone!

To help eliminate that distress, Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team put together five steps to help your child overcome his or her dental anxiety when visiting Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates.

1. Ask your child what they’re most afraid of. Is it the sound of the drill? Do you have needle phobia? Has your child been traumatized by previous dental visits? Have children write down their fears, one by one, and talk about them.

2. Don’t wait. The more frequently your child visits our office, the less work will need to be done at any given visit. Simply having Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat professionally clean your child’s teeth twice a year prevents many, if not most, problems down the road.

3. Bring a distraction such as music to your child’s appointment. Just plug in those earphones, have your child close his or her eyes, and get lost in the music. Listening to tunes can also be a pain killer.

4. Remind your child to unwind. Inhaling slowly and counting to five helps. Encourage children to hold their breath for ten seconds, then exhale slowly to the count of eight, and repeat as needed. It’s easier if they’re not focused on the work going on inside their mouth.

5. Ask us. Before any procedure your child undergoes, we encourage you to ask Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat or one of our assistants why we’re using the tools we’re using. Ask us what we’re doing during your child’s procedure, what the tool is used for, and how it benefits your child. Also, please ask about anti-anxiety medications we may prescribe to help your child relax during his or her appointment.

Remember, our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates are health care professionals who strive to improve your child’s oral health, and will do all we can to ensure a trauma- and pain-free experience during his or her visit!

We hope these tips help! For more on pediatric dental anxieties, ask us during your next visit to our Frederick office! Or, ask us below or on Facebook!

Clean Toothbrush/Healthy Toothbrush

August 17th, 2022

We’ve all learned a lot about staying healthy lately. As a parent, you give good advice about avoiding germs in public places, cleaning things that get touched a lot like phones and keyboards, and learning the best way to wash hands. These small daily habits can have a big effect on your child’s health.

And since you’re already taking care of your little one by making sure they brush at least twice a day, we have some good advice for small habits which can make their toothbrush even cleaner and brushing even healthier.

Brushing Habits

Don’t let germs hitch a ride on your child’s toothbrush before they even begin brushing! Make sure their hands are clean before they start, and rinse off the toothbrush before they put it in their mouth.

After brushing, be sure your child rinses their brush carefully to get rid of leftover toothpaste and bits of food. Also, clean the toothbrush holder regularly to get rid of germs and bacteria.

And while we’re talking about germs, how about . . .

  • Flushing Habits

Most toothbrushes live in the bathroom, where we also find—the toilet. Every time we flush, invisible bacteria and particles fly through the air. And while that might not make you sick, it’s still pretty gross. Closing the lid before you flush helps keep your family’s toothbrushes—and bathroom—cleaner.

  • Airing? Yes!

Keeping a toothbrush in a dark, wet environment is the perfect way to help bacteria grow. Instead of putting a wet toothbrush in a case, let it air dry standing heads up after use. Give it a shake first for a head start on drying out.

  • Sharing? No

We’re not talking about sharing a brush, which you would never do. We’re talking about sharing space. If your child’s brush touches other brushes in a toothbrush holder, it’s probably sharing germs. Toothbrushes shouldn’t be too close to other toothbrushes, no matter how close you are to the other brush’s owner!

Finally, no matter how well your child takes care of their toothbrush, there comes a time when you should let it go. After three or four months, bristles become frayed and worn out. This means the brush won’t remove plaque as well as it used to. And to be on the safe side, it’s a good idea to replace a brush if your child has been sick.

Keeping your child’s teeth and mouth healthy is one very important way to keep their whole body heathy and happy. Talk to Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat at our Frederick office to learn more about simple habits for healthy teeth!

Fluoride Use in Adolescents

August 10th, 2022

Fluoride is a mineral that plays an essential role in oral health. In fact, the significant reduction in American tooth decay in recent decades can be attributed to a greater availability of fluoride in public water supplies, toothpaste, and other resources. When it comes in contact with the teeth, fluoride helps protect the enamel from acid and plaque bacteria. In some cases, it can even reverse tooth decay in its earliest stages.

Despite the benefits of fluoride, tooth decay is still common, especially among teenagers. The Centers for Disease Control reports that cavities can be found in more than half of young teens and two-thirds of older teens over age 16. Many of those teens are deficient in fluoride, either due to a lack of public water fluoridation or the use of bottled water. So how can parents ensure their teens are getting the fluoride they need to facilitate strong, healthy teeth?

Monitor Fluoride Exposure

Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates recommend you start by measuring your teen’s fluoride exposure. Make sure you purchase fluoridated toothpaste for your household, and find out if your tap water is fluoridated. If your teen primarily consumes bottled water, examine the bottle to determine whether fluoride has been added. The majority of bottled waters are not supplemented with fluoride, but those that are will be clearly labeled.

Fluoride Supplementation

Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat may recommend topical fluoride treatments at routine dental exams. These treatments are painless for your teen and may help establish stronger enamel that is more resistant to plaque and tooth decay. If you have a public water supply that is non-fluoridated, we may recommend fluoride supplementation between visits. These can be administered as drops, tablets, or vitamins.

Keep in mind that fluoride is most important for children and teens under the age of 16. Be proactive about your teen’s oral health by speaking with us about your family’s fluoride needs at your next dental visit.

For more information about fluoride, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat, please give us a call at our convenient Frederick office!

What is a water pick and do I need one?

August 3rd, 2022

Water picks, sometimes called “oral irrigators,” make an excellent addition to your regular home care regimen of brushing and flossing. Especially helpful to those who suffer from periodontal disease and those patients of ours undergoing orthodontic treatment with full-bracketed braces, water picks use powerful tiny bursts of water to dislodge food scraps, bacteria, and other debris nestled in the crevices of your mouth. Children undergoing orthodontic treatment may find using a water pick is beneficial if their toothbrush bristles tend to get caught on their wires or brackets.

When you use a water pick, you’re not only dislodging any particles or debris and bacteria you might have missed when brushing, you are also gently massaging the gums, which helps promote blood flow in the gums and keeps them healthy. While water picks are an excellent addition to your daily fight against gingivitis and other periodontal diseases, they are incapable of fully removing plaque, which is why Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates want to remind you to keep brushing and flossing every day.

If you have sensitive teeth or gums and find it uncomfortable to floss daily, water picks are a good alternative to reduce discomfort while effectively cleaning between teeth. Diabetics sometimes prefer water picks to flossing because they don't cause bleeding of the gums, which can be a problem with floss. If you have a permanent bridge, crowns, or other dental restoration, you may find that a water pick helps you keep the area around the restorations clean.

So how do you choose the right water pick?

Water picks are available for home or portable use. The home versions tend to be larger and use standard electrical outlets, while portable models use batteries. Aside from the size difference, they work in the same manner, both using pulsating water streams. A more crucial difference between water picks is the ability to adjust the pressure. Most home models will let you choose from several pressure settings, depending on how sensitive your teeth and gums are. Most portable models have only one pressure setting. If you want to use mouthwash or a dental rinse in your water pick, check the label first; some models suggest using water only.

Please give us a call at our Frederick office if you have any questions about water picks, or ask Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat during your next visit!

Dental Emergencies in Children

July 27th, 2022

Unfortunately, dental emergencies can sometimes be unavoidable among young children. The good news is Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat can help you prepare in case you and your child find yourselves in any of the following situations.

Teething

Starting at about four months and lasting up to three years, your son or daughter may experience teething pain. It’s common for teething children to grow irritable and become prone to drooling due to tender gums. Give your child a cold teething ring or rub his or her gums with your finger to help relieve the discomfort.

Loss of Teeth

If a baby tooth is knocked out in an accident, bring your child to our Frederick office to make sure damage hasn’t occurred in the mouth. Permanent teeth can sometimes grow in before baby teeth have fallen out. In this situation, Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat should examine your child to make sure teeth are growing in properly. This can prevent serious issues from arising later in adulthood.

Gum Issues

Bleeding gums could mean several things. They may be an early sign of periodontal disease, which results from poor oral hygiene. Gums may also bleed if a youngster is brushing too hard or has suffered an injury to the gum tissue.

Rinse your child’s mouth with warm salt water and apply pressure to the area if bleeding continues. Don’t hesitate to contact our Frederick office if you are concerned so we can schedule an appointment.

As a parent, you can provide the best education for your children on proper oral hygiene habits. If you some coaching, ask Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat for tips during your next appointment.

Five Nutrition Tips for Healthy Kids' Smiles

July 20th, 2022

If your child could have it his way, chances are he would eat Lucky Charms for breakfast, a peanut butter and fluff sandwich for lunch, and chicken fingers slathered in ketchup for dinner.

Kids will be kids, and maintaining a healthy diet is often the farthest thing from their minds. Do you remember the old saying “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”? Well, that folksy wisdom can be applied to oral health, too. Think of it like this: an apple a day keeps the dentist at bay. Here are five nutrition tips Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team at Frederick Pediatric Dental Associates wanted to pass along that will give your child a healthy, bright smile.

  1. Eat a well-balanced diet of fruits and vegetables. We weren't joking about the apple. An apple naturally scrubs and cleans your teeth. The nutrients and antioxidants in vegetables are good for the entire body.
  2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, calcium is a mineral needed by the body for healthy bones and teeth, and proper function of the heart, muscles, and nerves. Dairy products like milk, cheese, and yogurt are good sources of calcium. Dark leafy vegetables and calcium-fortified foods like orange juice and tofu are also healthy options.
  3. Keep snacking to a minimum. Sticky and gummy snacks can increase a child’s risk of tooth decay. Unless a child brushes after every snack (and what child does?), sticky snacks can easily get lodged between the teeth.
  4. Limit soda intake. Drinking large amounts of soda has been linked to childhood obesity. Soda is loaded with sugars and acids, and these ingredients also damage the teeth. Soft drinks have long been one of the most prominent sources of tooth decay. Have your child drink water throughout the day or juice that’s low in sugar concentrate.
  5. Chew sugarless gum. After all those fruits and vegetables, sooner or later your child is going to want a treat. Chewing gum stimulates saliva, which in turn helps keep teeth clean and bacteria-free. Sugarless gum contains xylitol. The combination of excess saliva and xylitol reduces plaque, fights cavities, and prevents the growth of oral bacteria.

For more information on keeping your child’s smile looking its very best, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat, please give us a call at our convenient Frederick office!

There’s an App for That!

July 13th, 2022

Kids today are more tech-savvy than ever before. Even young children use computers, tablets and smart phones to make learning about their world more accessible and more enjoyable. And with the enormous variety of apps geared to childhood education, it comes as no surprise that you can download an app to encourage your children to learn about—and celebrate—their dental health.

What kinds of apps are available for your child?

Happy Brushing!

Children’s apps can offer helpful advice for learning effective brushing and flossing habits that will last a lifetime. Some of the apps for young brushers include:

  • Age appropriate instructions for proper brushing technique
  • Two minutes of carefully chosen songs or stories to keep them brushing the recommended amount of time in an entertaining way
  • Reminders to replace those little toothbrushes—every three months, please!
  • Educational games and stories to teach effective dental habits and tooth-healthy food choices.

The best apps not only provide lots of important information for keeping young teeth and gums their healthiest, but make learning fun with rewards such as badges, stars, games, or simply plenty of positive encouragement.

Time for the Tooth Fairy to Appear?

Losing a tooth is an important event for many young children. If you’re a fan of the Tooth Fairy, there are apps that can provide some reassuring fun while your child waits for that first loose tooth to finally come out. Tooth Fairy apps offer a wide variety of activities, including:

  • Tooth Fairy voicemails to report a loose or lost tooth
  • Tooth Fairy diaries to record lost teeth—and save photos of the adorable smiles that result
  • A video of an animated Tooth Fairy fluttering around your child’s pillow on the big night
  • A Tooth Fairy alert for forgetful Tooth Fairy assistants.

Apply the Latest in Brushing Technology

If you’ve decided that an electric toothbrush is the best brush for your child, many of the products available today come with their own apps. What can these apps do?

  • Let children know if they’ve brushed long enough
  • Alert them when they’re brushing too hard, which is not good for young gums and enamel
  • Some apps even provide a map of the mouth and teeth that lets children know just where they’ve brushed, in case they tend to neglect a few spots regularly.

Keep Those Appointments

Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat and our team are here to help keep your child’s teeth healthy. Regular examinations and professional cleanings at our Frederick office not only make sure problems are caught before they become serious, they can help prevent problems from developing in the first place.

There are many apps out there that are designed to help you keep your child’s dental care on track with appointment reminders. This sounds pretty basic, but when kids have school, sports, lessons, and activities filling their days, it doesn’t hurt to get a timely reminder that Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat should be seeing someone in your family for an appointment or checkup and a cleaning in the near future.

Dentist Approved

When looking for a dental app for children, there are lots of options. The best apps provide age-appropriate educational tips for keeping young smiles healthy, and present them in a way that engages your child’s imagination and provides positive reinforcement.

If you think an app might make dental care not only more efficient, but more enjoyable for your child, talk to Dr. T.P. Sivakumar, Dr. Savithri Sivakumar, Dr. Emily Little, Dr. Kevin Banks, Dr. Sruthi Paimagham, Dr. Sagar Patel, Dr. Nikki Fischbach and Dr. Wendy Daulat! We might have some suggestions that will be just right for your family.